In good company

Sir Geoff has often been quoted as saying there were five world class players in the 1966 World Cup team, so who were the magical five?

"One of the key elements of the '66 success was the backbone of the team, says Geoff. "Gordon Banks in goal, Bobby Moore at the back, Bobby Charlton in midfield and Jimmy Greaves up front. We have seen individual talents in different positions over the years but we have never quite managed to emulate that formidable combination of skills in one team."

Gordon Banks

"Gordon was the best goalkeeper this country has ever seen - possibly the best in the world. I can't remember him making a mistake during the games I played with him. He will, of course, always be remembered for his great save against Pele in the World Cup against Brazil in 1970 but Gordon will tell you that his best save was against me! It was a penalty during the semi-final of the 1971 League Cup between Stoke and West Ham. It was also the first penalty I had ever missed." Read more at the National Football Museum's Hall of Fame

Bobby Moore

"A great captain and a great leader, Bobby's status as the only English captain ever to lift the World Cup speaks for itself. His talent and skill on the ball made him a great player but it was his reading of the game that put him in a different league - he was almost telepathic. We have never seen a player of his calibre in that position since '66." Read more at the National Football Museum's Hall of Fame

Bobby Charlton

"Bobby was one of the most naturally gifted players I have ever played with or against. His record in goal scoring is almost unbelievable for a mid-fielder. At international level, he played 106 games and scored 49 goals. He remains the best two-footed player I have ever seen on a pitch. Even his brother, Jack, has never known which is his best foot." Read more at the National Football Museum's Hall of Fame

Jimmy Greaves

"Jimmy was, quite simply, a genius at the most difficult part of the game - scoring goals - and I don't use the word 'genius' lightly. His record speaks for itself, on average, he scored almost three goals in every four games and, quite rightly, he is regarded as England's greatest ever goal scorer." Read more at the National Football Museum's Hall of Fame

Ray Wilson

"Ray is the least well-known of the five but, if you speak to the majority of England players around that time, they will say he was the 'other' world class player. Lightning quick, his tackles were like the strike of a cobra. He was also superb in the air - particularly for a smaller player. He is arguably the best left back we've ever had in this country." Read more at the National Football Museum's Hall of Fame